Terry Clark Photography

Are you looking for a photographer that can bring a fresh and creative eye to your next project or portrait?

Then look no further. Terry Clark Photography is one of the most sought after photographers in the country. Having photographed three Presidents of the United States, kings, titans of industry, and business of all size and description, there is no assignment too small or too large.

Having traveled far and wide to create storytelling pictures for his clients, Terry Clark Photography has the experience and knowledge to pull together any project, domestic or International. If compelling images are most important to you and your client, working with our team will ensure the success of your project.

Call 412-491-7887 to speak with a team member about your next photo shoot.

email – terry@terryclark.com

Filtering by Tag: Pittsburgh annual report photographer

Get into the scene

Things I learned long ago. Get in close, put the viewer in the scene. It's a small frame, use every millimeter, edge to edge. 

Working with Landesberg Design on an annual report for The Pittsburgh Foundation this was a dance class. It was pretty "free form," which is another way of saying it was crazy. Kids were everywhere doing their thing. I just tried to stay in the middle of it all and key in on a few of the more expressive dancers. Everything came together in this frame, edge to edge. The moment I pressed the shutter, I could feel the gentle hand on my shoulder from my old professor, Joseph Costa. I knew that one would make him proud.

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Reflections

While on assignment many years ago for EQT I spotted the oil rig in my subjects safety glasses. It was an easy task to position the man in the right light and maintain the reflection. An unusually tight crop emphasized the rig, his eye and the EQT logo on his hard hat. The three formed a perfect triangle while the oval created by the lip of his helmet added a sense of motion within the frame. As always, geometry is your best friend when building a picture.

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Sister of Mercy

Once upon a time, I did a lot of work at Mercy Hospital. It was long before there were HIPAA Laws and long before UPMC took over. Back then the Sister’s of Mercy ran the hospital.

On one assignment I was given the freedom just to wander, explore and see what pictures I could find. Sometimes I would stroll the halls and floors, and sometimes I would have a target person, like the Sister here. 

I followed the Nun on her rounds visiting patients. Before I made pictures, one of us would explain to the patient what I was doing. Most times nobody cared because I was working for the Sisters of Mercy. If I got the green light, I would just disappear into the background and watch for interactions. I wanted moments of tenderness and connection. I remember it was effortless with this Sister as she had a way to connect with everyone. She would talk and pray with the patients, as she is here. 

The most challenging task was to find a clean and powerful composition. In this room, I positioned myself to use the vertical lines in the curtain and the bar on the bed as compositional aids. The cross she wore was the perfect counterpoint to these lines and provided the first triangle of the image. As she leaned forward, she gently touched the woman’s head. With my second and third triangle now complete, I squeezed off a frame with my Leica M3 and 50mm lens. 

Early on I learned to work a scene hard. I was taught to shoot different angles, use all my lenses, and adjust composition. Give the editor choice. On this job, I followed those rules if it made sense. In this situation, it did not. I needed to be quiet and not disturb the scene. So, I picked my angle, my lens, and waited for the right frame to appear, one to show the love and humanity of this beautiful Sister of Mercy.

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