Terry Clark Photography

Are you looking for a photographer that can bring a fresh and creative eye to your next project or portrait?

Then look no further. Terry Clark Photography is one of the most sought after photographers in the country. Having photographed three Presidents of the United States, kings, titans of industry, and business of all size and description, there is no assignment too small or too large.

Having traveled far and wide to create storytelling pictures for his clients, Terry Clark Photography has the experience and knowledge to pull together any project, domestic or International. If compelling images are most important to you and your client, working with our team will ensure the success of your project.

Call 412-491-7887 to speak with a team member about your next photo shoot.

email – terry@terryclark.com

Filtering by Tag: Pittsburgh fine art photography

Breathe

Some days you need to take time for yourself. A breather, a pause, a respite. Smell nature. Feel sand between your toes. Sit under a tree and listen to the leaves. Do whatever gives you peace. If you don't recharge your batteries, they die. If you don't renew yourself, well, I think you know my meaning. We all need to walk away for a day, a week, a few hours. Do whatever it takes to find your center. Keep yourself fresh so the light can shine from within you. 

I've been on a slow recharge for a few days. Yesterday, late afternoon was spent listening to trees and feeling the breeze around Lake Arthur. I needed to find my quiet. As I was leaving, this scene got my attention. It was the congruity of nature. Rock and trees, leaves and branches, light and dark all working together in harmony and peace. Mission accomplished.

Rock face at Moraine State Park / Lake Arthur

Rock face at Moraine State Park / Lake Arthur

The Traveler

As photographers, we write with light. It's the essence of what we do. 

Light shapes, sculpts and envelopes who we photograph. Every form of it has a different effect and sends a distinctive message. With light, you can make your subject appear soft and inviting or harsh and threatening. You can add drama or mystery. Shape it, bend it, diffuse it, reflect it or channel it any way you want to convey the feeling and narrative you desire. 

With light, there is always darkness, the shadow. The two opposites, yin, and yang work together or tear apart depending on your intent.  

In "The Traveler" the daylight is sharp, and the shadow is heavy. Because of the angle of the sun, it appears she's moving in that direction, into the light while the shadow feels heavy, weighing her down. Variations of gray on the wall and the diagonal line from the shadow further enhance the illusion of movement. Questions abound. Why is she traveling? Where is she going? Is she afraid or looking forward to the journey. The two other subject shadows stretching toward her adds another layer of mystery and suspense. Are they merely fellow travelers, protectors or antagonists? 

Success or failure of a photograph depends on many factors. The viewer's interpretation weighs heavy on that decision. But, each person decides for themselves drawing from their life experience and tastes. No one person is correct or wrong. Hence the old saying, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. In the end, it's up to you, the creator, to decide if the story you told by writing with light was a tale worth telling. 

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Always looking for pictures

Always be looking.

Leaving the opening of my friend Julie Kosser's senior show last week on the north side, the sharp brilliance of sunset strafed across the buildings in the alley. The chiaroscuro of the scene just begged for a photo. Always carrying a camera, I happily obliged. 

Other than a good set of eyes, a handy camera, and accurate metering there is nothing special about the technique of this image. It is, as they say, f-8 and be there. Being there, present, aware and ready to go is the key to success.

Always be looking and always ready.

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Sunshine reflected

If you always carry a camera you never have to go out to photograph. All you have to do is see.

Two people walking down the sidewalk by the old Allegheny County Jail added a human element and scale to the textural quality provided by reflected sunshine off the Mellon Bank Building. Photographed at a stop light from my car window with a Fuji X100F. Always be ready, and always carry a camera.

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Go out and see

When out I'm looking for pictures. I call it "shadow boxing," searching for images, exercising my eye, my vision and all other senses. I'm not looking for masterpieces; I'm just putting pieces together that work. Light and shadow, sticks and stones, color, you name it I'm looking for it. Just like a professional boxer still hits the heavy bag, a photographer needs to hit the streets and trails to keep sharp. And, as Jay Maisel has said if you're always carrying a camera you never have to go out to take pictures. It's a part of you.

Another thing I do is usually travel with just one lens. My carry camera of choice these days is a Fuji X100F. It has a fixed lens equivalent to a 35mm, perfect for street photography. 

Using one lens over and over will ingrain that view in your mind, so it becomes muscle memory. Then, when you come across a scene, you will frame it before you ever pick up the camera. 

In the photo, Stick & Stone, I was carrying a Leica M6 with a 35mm Summicron on a walk through McConnell's Mills when I noticed beautiful natural arrangement. To make it compositionally work, I had to step carefully out on a few exposed rocks along the river's edge. Please note, this action is not advisable or encouraged as the rocks are extremely slippery and dangerous. Many people have drowned from slipping off stones into the water and getting caught by an undertow. I knew the risk, but I also saw the reward in my mind's eye. I was also young and more foolish. OK, young at least. But with just one camera to worry about I had pretty good balance and a friend was with me in case I needed a hand.

Throughout my career, I've tried to use as little gear as possible in personal work and on assignments. I may own a wide range of equipment and pack it all for jobs, but I'll only carry a few extra lenses in my shoulder bag. I've said many times; focal lengths between 28mm and 90mm will handle most assignments. That opinion isn't just mine. Henri Cartier-Bresson told his Magnum colleagues they should not use any lens outside that basic kit. Who will argue with HCB?

Of course, there will always be exceptions to the rule depending on the demands of the job and especially today with the proliferation of high-quality zoom lenses. But while zooms are convenient, they can make photographers lazy. It's too easy to rack the zoom in and out to fill the frame forgetting the primary idea of focal length is to change the perspective. When I use a zoom, I look first at the focal length then through the camera because I've already decided what view I want to deliver. I'll move closer or further back to fill the frame with the zoom God gave me, my feet. 

It doesn't matter what device you use other than your eyeballs. Just go out and see.

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Just another morning in Italy

It's the kind of weather we can only dream of in Pittsburgh. A warm breeze caressing the skin. Sunshine casting sharp shadows as the bright life-giving sun in the sky breaks the horizon. Layered clouds placed against an azure backdrop to add visual interest to an already dramatic scene. Trees flawlessly placed on the top of the hill as if set there by artistic design. And the field. Row upon perfectly spaced row. All illuminated to a bright shimmer by the sun. Lines, shapes, graphics, balance, tones all working together in symphonic harmony. Or, as they say, just another morning in Italy.

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Refresh and Recharge

There are days when the well runs dry. Maybe it’s cold, rainy or just one of those blue days when nothing goes right. Don’t give up. Take a break. Go for a walk. Breathe deep and recharge. Keep your eyes open and look around you for the little things. 

Go back to the basics. It’s time for some visual shadow boxing. I don’t mean shadow literally, but it could be. Just look about you and open your mind, heart, and soul to the world. Laugh out loud, chuckle to yourself and smile. Find the joy within. Remember what it was like the first time you saw a picture, be it in the darkroom, or on the LCD screen. 

The weather in Pittsburgh has been lousy. It’s February. So don’t sweat it, just shoot. Find a theme, or not. Work on a narrative, or not. Just see. Shoot. Repeat. Spring is right around the corner. 

 

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Balance, Line and Form

In school, I hated higher math. Algebra was the tip of the spear.  I tried to make sense of it but failed miserably. Then, like a breath from Heaven came Geometry. And the Lord said, go forth and angle! My grade point average soared. 

Once I started doing photography, I figured out why geometry came so naturally. That’s also the last time I thought about it. It wasn’t something I had to work on; I could just see in my mind and make it so.

I captured one of my all-time favorite geometric photos in 2011 at Grove City College. I was doing a shoot to build the school’s image library. Wander the campus and look for interesting pictures. I came upon this scene before the students class change. I saw the graphics and the light coming from within the frame. It was interesting, but it needed a human element. I waited. My Leica M9 and 35mm Summicron were ready. 

As students began to rush up and down the stairs, in and out of the frame, I did what I always do in these situations – try to slow my mind to a Zen state to capture a precise composition. I got it. This one frame has everything I was trying to put in the image. Take out any of the figures or change the positions even slightly and the picture would fail. Shoot one shutter speed higher, and the photograph would not have the proper sense of motion. Less depth of field and the image would not read correctly throughout the frame. But this one frame has it all, up and down, side to side, all the angles covered. My high school geometry teacher would be proud.

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