Terry Clark Photography

Are you looking for a photographer that can bring a fresh and creative eye to your next project or portrait?

Then look no further. Terry Clark Photography is one of the most sought after photographers in the country. Having photographed three Presidents of the United States, kings, titans of industry, and business of all size and description, there is no assignment too small or too large.

Having traveled far and wide to create storytelling pictures for his clients, Terry Clark Photography has the experience and knowledge to pull together any project, domestic or International. If compelling images are most important to you and your client, working with our team will ensure the success of your project.

Call 412-491-7887 to speak with a team member about your next photo shoot.

email – terry@terryclark.com

Filtering by Tag: Pittsburgh sports photography

Anticipation

Anticipation: noun. Expectation or hope. 

We've all been there. Hanging on by a thread, excited for the outcome, hoping things go in our favor. Maybe it's waiting to hear about the birth of a child, a big job offer, the lottery numbers or springtime in Pittsburgh. Whatever reason it might be, anticipation is a universal emotion. 

Anticipation is a look on the face, body language, and feeling. It provokes tension.  Capturing it in a picture can elevate the image to another level. 

Why it works:

In the photo "Waiting for the Call," anticipation is present on every face and in the body language of the umpire. From the kickup of dust on the lower left to the extended hand of the official on the upper right, there is a diagonal line leading your eye quickly through the frame. Diagonals provide speed and power. Over and over triangles are formed by the people in the picture adding strength and dynamism to the composition. The fence, divided into three rectangles, emulates the three players in the foreground but contrasts with them in their geometry. 

And then there's the timing of the shot. A fraction of a second earlier or later and the image would not be what it is. The composition would be off, the expressions changed, and the umpire's hand, arm, and foot would not be in position. Practice anticipating action makes this image, not the burst of a motor drive. One frame is all you need. One frame is all I got. 

 

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"You shoot too pretty"

I was taught from day one to see different. If there is a pack of photographers on the left, go right. If the action seems straight ahead, look behind. Whatever you do, don’t do what everyone else is doing. This advice has carried me pretty well through the years. 

One genre of photography I always enjoyed was sports. I’ve covered contests big and small, backyard brawls to prime time bowls. No matter if it was basketball or Bocchi, I tried to apply the lesson I learned so long ago – be different, work an angle, shoot tighter, shoot looser, capture the moment after the action, and always, look beyond the playing field.

Working this way can have its drawbacks if you’re working for a publication. While you might capture a different view of the game, it might not be the right view or the most storytelling picture for that contest. Alex Persons, a UPI wire service photographer, told me in early 1980’s, “You shoot too pretty.” 

He wanted Gladiator. I gave him Swan Lake. 

I was ok with that.

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